Aero News - Noticias Aeronáuticas
 
10/23/2008 4:30:00 PM | Stratos Dreams Big With Small 714 Single-Engine Jet

All-new design airplanes from startup companies are often called "paper airplanes" because the company has no track record of producing any kind of airplane. So when you design a paper airplane, you should shoot for the moon, and Stratos, a new would-be jet maker in Bend, Oregon, has with its Model 714 personal jet. For 2-million bucks per copy Stratos says the 714 will carry four people and baggage for 1,500 nm cruising at 41,000 feet with IFR reserves. Stratos accurately points out that no existing or planned airplane can do all of that.


The Stratos 714 is the brainchild of Carsten Sundin, who has had long involvement with the kit plane maker Lancair, and entrepreneur Michael Lamaire. The Stratos formula is to provide only four seats, high speed and very long range, clearly an airplane that owner-pilots want. To achieve their goals the airplane will be very lightweight because of its composite construction. And the performance will come from plenty of power, 3,030 pounds of thrust from a single Williams FJ44-3AP turbofan engine. With a projected maximum takeoff weight of 7,000 pounds the 714 would have a thrust-to-weight ratio of 2.3 to 1, which is more thrust per pound of airplane than even the speedy Mach .92 Citation X. Typical twin-engine jets have thrust-to-weight ratios of around 3 to 1. Clearly such a power-to-weight ratio would get the 714 to its certified ceiling of 41,000 feet quickly. And if you want to leave friends behind, promised IFR range is 2,000 nm with only two onboard.


Diamond launched the single-engine personal jet category with announcement of its D-Jet several years ago. But the D-Jet concept is far different from Stratos, as Diamond is developing a jet with a performance and operating envelope that will not be a big leap for the single-engine piston pilots expected to be the majority of customers. Cirrus is following a similar path with its SJ50 Vision jet. Piper is aiming for more performance from the PiperJet with a top cruise of 360 knots, and the V-tailed Eclipse EA400 single is somewhere in between with a projected cruise of 330 knots. None of the airplanes have entered production, though Diamond has been flying developmental D-Jets for many months, Cirrus has an early test article in flight, and by the time you read this Piper is expected to have flown a PiperJet.


To accomplish its dream Stratos faces the usual bugbears of keeping empty weight low so payload doesn't disappear, meeting the stall speed limit of 61 knots for single-engine airplanes, dealing with the spin requirement all singles face, and exploring the certification requirements of turbine singles. For example, no single-engine turbine we know of has been certified for flight above 31,000 feet, and it's impossible to predict how the FAA will interpret rules that apply above that level. And, of course, the old saying that it is money that propels all airplanes raises a big question mark for any startup manufacturer in today's economic and credit environment.


Renderings of the 714 show that Stratos has elected to use engine air inlets in the wing roots feeding an engine mounted below and aft of the cabin through ducts. The airplane has two external baggage compartments, one large enough for golf clubs or skis, an important feature for any owner pilot. The wing—for which no dimensions were released—is to be of laminar flow design, and Stratos will pressurize the cabin to such a level that it will remain at or below 6,000 feet when the airplane is flying at 41,000 feet.


The speed, range, payload and selling price goals of the 714 all appear to be very difficult to achieve—a point driven home by the fact that none of the other companies have even attempted them—but the most challenging target in the Stratos plan is first delivery in early 2010. That gives the company just over 18 months to build prototypes, complete certification and enter production. For more information, contact Stratos at stratosaircraft.com.



Fuente: FlyingMag.com


10/23/2008 11:43:00 AM | What is the EZ Rocket?

What is the EZ Rocket?

The EZ-Rocket is a modified Long-EZ homebuilt aircraft. The aircraft is powered by twin 400 lb thrust regeneratively cooled rocket engines and fueled by isopropyl alcohol and liquid oxygen. The EZ-Rocket includes an external composite fuel tank and an insulated internal aluminum liquid oxygen tank. The modifications were performed at XCOR Aerospace's Mojave, CA shop. Tests were performed at the Mojave Civilian Flight Test Center.  The EZ-Rocket has also flown at EAA Oshkosh 2002, the largest airshow in the world, held in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and the Countdown to X-Prize Cup event, in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

Why did you put rocket engines in a Long-EZ?

To show that we can design and build a complete aircraft rocket propulsion system that is safe, simple, cheap, reliable, and above all operable. We are not trying to sell similar aircraft for private use. The choice of the Long-EZ as an airframe was based on its pusher configuration and its good power-off glide capability. By flying and testing, we have gained valuable experience that will make the next generation engines better.

What is that big tank under the airplane?

That is the fuel tank. No propellants are carried in the Long-EZ gas tanks because they are not resistant to alcohol, and because we pressurize the fuel tank more than the strake tanks can handle. The two aluminum liquid oxygen tanks are insulated with styrofoam and occupy the back seat.

Test Pilot Dick Rutan after a successful flight #4

Who are your test pilots?

Dick Rutan was our original test pilot and a design modification consultant for the EZ-Rocket.  As the factory test pilot and major record holder for the Long-EZ, he has over 4,000 hours of flight time in the piston engine version of this airframe.   Dick has flown the EZ-Rocket seventeen times, most notably on its earlier flights.  He has flown it in front of live network television cameras, in front of the crowds at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, and for its record-breaking flight from Mojave to California City.

Richard Searfoss has piloted XCOR’s EZ Rocket 8 times; most notably at the Countdown to the X-Prize Cup in Las Cruces, NM, October, 2005.  A two-time Columbia shuttle pilot, Rick is our chief company test pilot and primary pilot for the Rocket Racer, the follow up program to the EZ-Rocket..

Mike Melvill flew chase in his Long-EZ for the EZ-Rocket during most of it's Mojave flights, and flew the EZ-Rocket itself on flight #8.   This was Mike's first experience with a rocket powered vehicle.   His first words after shutting the engines down were "That was a real kick in the pants!" Several years later, Mike became the first civilian astronaut on June 21, 2004 at the helm of SpaceShipOne.

What is the performance?

With both engines running (800 lb thrust total) and maximum propellant load, takeoff roll is 500m (1650 ft) for 20 seconds. After pulling up, climb is established at constant airspeed at Vne, or 195 knots. Burnout is, after a maximum of two minutes, still at 195 knots indicated, which equals Mach 0.4. The maximum altitude that can be attained is 1.91 miles (10,000 ft). The maximum climb rate is 52 m/sec (10,000 ft/min). It is likely we will never take the plane to the maximum altitude capability.  None of the operating limitations of a standard Long-EZ are exceeded in this airplane, although a steep climb is needed to keep from exceeding Vne with both engines running.

A static test at the washrack at the Mojave Spaceport

Does the pilot have to dead-stick land the airplane?

The plane makes a dead-stick landing each time, like a glider.   The engines are restartable in mid-flight.  We have performed numerous restarts and touch-and-goes - the latter of which has never been done in a rocket powered aircraft until now.

Does it make a lot of noise?

Yes. The sound level is 128 dB at 10 meters.  However, during test flights people on the ground have noted that it is quieter than many jet aircraft they have heard.

How many times have you flown?


The EZ-Rocket has flown 26 times. The first 13 flights were conducted at our base of operations at the Mojave Civilian Flight Test Center in Mojave, CA. Flights 14 and 15 were performed in front of very large crowds of airshow attendees at the EAA AirVenture Air Show in Wisconsin.  Following that success, flights 23 through 24 enthralled the large gathering at The Countdown to the X-Prize Cup Event in New Mexico in 2005.

What are the safety features of this airplane and its rocket propulsion system?

  • The airplane flies just like any other Long-EZ. The pilot does not need to learn to fly the plane at the same time as controlling the rocket propulsion systems. Single engine performance is similar to a Lycoming O-320 with constant speed prop.

  • There is an ultraviolet fire sensor in the engine bay that illuminates a light on the instrument panel in the event of a fire.

  • Large bottles of helium can be dumped into the engine bay by pilot command (the guarded "FIRE" switch on the upper panel) for fire suppression. These helium bottles hold several times the inert gas that a fire extinguisher bottle would.

  • Each engine has its own dedicated electrical system and controller. They can be independently started and stopped. The plane climbs well on a single engine.

    The EZ-Rocket on it's record flight from Mojave to Cal City
  • Each engine has its own kevlar blast shield.

  • Each engine has a chamber pressure gauge that lets the pilot monitor combustion health.

  • Each engine has a burn-through sensor connected to a red light on the panel (located just above the chamber pressure gauge).

  • The pilot can depressurize either or both propellant tanks in flight. This vents helium outside the airplane.

  • The pilot can dump the LOX through a manual valve into the atmosphere. Venting oxygen behind a 200 MPH glider is not hazardous.  We've demonstrated this during a safe-abort flight.

  • Most rocket engine explosions happen because of what is known as a hard start. This happens when main propellants collect in the combustion chamber and are belatedly ignited. We prevent this by interlocking the main valves with an igniter operation sensor. The only time an XCOR engine comes apart is when we put our wrenches on it.

  • Main propellant valves are mechanically linked together, preventing incorrect valve timing.

  • The pilot has a parachute and the canopy is quick to open.

  • If an engine fails to shut down, or a fire is detected, the pilot has a manually operated valve pair that shuts off both propellants to both engines.  We've used this feature successfully in a safe-abort flight.


Fuente: xcor.com


8/29/2008 10:58:00 AM | Zaragoza contará en primavera con una compañía de aerotaxi

El aeropuerto de Zaragoza contará en primavera con su primera compañía de aviación privada (aerotaxi) tras la fallida experiencia de Mac Aviation. La firma Jet Ready, constituida ayer por un grupo de accionistas de Valencia, Aragón y Navarra, tiene previsto abrir sendas bases de operaciones en Zaragoza y Valencia para operar una flota de quince aviones minijets con capacidad para transportar a 4 pasajeros.

La nueva empresa se presenta hoy en la comunidad vecina y la próxima semana en la capital aragonesa con el reclamo de revolucionar el sector, dado que promete volar a mitad de precio que su competencia. Jet Ready recibirá los primeros reactores en el segundo trimestre del año, fecha en la que iniciará su actividad. En un plazo de cinco años contará con la citada flota, compuesta en su integridad por minijets de nueva generación Eclipse 500, que le garantizará operar con más de 2.000 aeropuertos de toda Europa y del norte de África. El radio de acción ronda los 2.000 kilómetros.

El secreto para garantizar una aviación privada de bajo coste está en las características del avión, un jet muy ligero capaz de volar a casi la misma velocidad y altitud que sus competidores (700 km/h y 12.000 metros de techo) pero que puede aterrizar y despegar en pequeños aeródromos y que tiene menores costes de operación.

Solo necesita una pista de 700 metros de longitud, un tercio de la construida para dar servicio al pequeño aeropuerto de Huesca-Pirineos que aún por inaugurar. De esta forma, podrá volar casi a cualquier punto del mapa europeo que quiera el cliente.

La compañía asegura que sus precios serán un 50% más baratos que la aviación privada convencional, dado que su hora de vuelo rondará los 1.400 euros y los de su competencia, 3.000. "El precio de cualquier operación de Jet Ready tiene un coste menor o igual al de la clase business de cualquier aerolínea convencional", apunta.

Comparativa
De hecho, Jet Ready llega a poner como ejemplo un viaje entre Zaragoza y Hannover: Con su pequeño reactor costaría 1.440 euros por persona (siempre y cuando fueran cuatro), mientras que si el pasajero se desplazara en tren a tomar otro avión a Barcelona le saldría por 2170 euros, siempre según sus cálculos.

Este avión es mucho más barato, en torno a 1,25 millones de euros, y permite utilizar aeródromos descongestionados, cuyas tasas son mucho más baratas. Las otras dos razones que explican sus precios competitivos son que requiere un único piloto, con el consiguiente ahorro en personal, y que su mantenimiento es más sencillo.

La compañía, además, tiene previsto hacer promociones especiales para llenar sus aviones y favorecer al cliente. Así, las plazas libres en vuelos incompletos serán ofertadas, siempre que quieran los usuarios, para abaratar el coste del viaje.



Fuente: master Alonso, Elperiodicodearagon.com. Foto: Servicio Especial


1/18/2008 2:11:00 PM | La aviación ejecutiva facturará en España unos 400 millones en los próximos dos años

Crece la demanda de este tipo de aviones entre ejecutivos, sobre todo para ahorrar tiempo en el viaje.

La aviación ejecutiva facturará en España más de 400 millones de euros en dos años, con la aparición de nuevos proyectos empresariales, entre cuatro y diez, y una inversión de 200 a 300 millones de euros.

El presidente de Interflight, Óscar García, y el consejero delegado de la Sociedad General de Vuelo, Javier Díez, destacaron el potencial de crecimiento que tiene la aviación ejecutiva en España, en un momento que calificaron de «histórico».

Para García, España, que posee actualmente el 7% del total de aviones de este tipo que hay en Europa -175- tiene un potencial de crecimiento del 40%, y puede y debe llegar a los 250 en un plazo de cinco años. «Actualmente tenemos subdesarrollado nuestro volumen», dijo.

Este crecimiento hace que España sea el tercer país del mundo en número de pedidos, por detrás del Reino Unido y de Estados Unidos, país este último que mantiene la hegemonía en este tipo de transporte.

A nivel mundial hay 27.600 unidades de este tipo de aviones más pequeños -de dos a 20 plazas- que los comerciales y la cartera de nuevas incorporaciones entre 2007 y 2012 es de 4.000 aparatos. Las predicciones hasta el 2017 es de alcanzar la cifra de 12.000.

Alianzas

Por su parte, Javier Díez, que lidera la iniciativa de poner en marcha un servicio de aerotaxis, Jet for you, quiere ser a partir de este mes la referencia de un servicio business de conexión punto a punto y de corto radio, para lo que se ha contratado un total de 36 aviones con la firma brasileña Embraer. Para Díez, la oportunidad que tiene es la de «buscar el hueco oportuno» donde no haya mucha competencia, e incluso llegar a hacer alianzas, como por ejemplo con Iberia, «con quien estamos hablando, para alcanzar una colaboración como la que tiene Lufthansa o la que está buscando Air France-KLM».

La idea sobre la que se basa esta nueva compañía de vuelos en aviones ejecutivos es la de conseguir que el cliente gane tiempo, sobre todo en tierra, porque el tiempo de vuelo es más o menos el mismo entre un punto y otro.

La Sociedad General de Vuelo está integrada por Wondair, compañía de aviación ejecutiva, Jet For you, Interwelcome, sociedad responsable del servicio VIP de atención en tierra a los pasajeros, Aropublic, dedicada a la publicidad y fotografía aérea, y Mantenair, de mantenimiento.

Díez destacó que para su empresa precisan gran número de pilotos. «Necesitamos cinco por cada avión, y si se consideran los 36 aviones solicitados, la cifra es de 180 pilotos», advirtió.

Asimismo, y de cara al mantenimiento, lo ideal, para Díez, es tener seis ó siete bases en España, y crear un gran centro de excelencia, que podría encontrarse en Valencia.

Aeropuertos

En 2008 la línea Jet For you va a comenzar a funcionar en Valencia, Bilbao y Sevilla, y no en Madrid, porque el aeropuerto de Torrejón de Ardoz plantea «graves problemas de espacio aéreo, por lo que hemos decidido no volar a Madrid».

Según Díez, en España se va a llegar en los próximos años a tener 300 aeropuertos operativos, cifra en la que se incluyen no sólo los aeropuertos, sino hasta los aeródromos de formación con pistas de tierra.

El grupo Globalia prevé entrar también en este nuevo nicho de mercado. PepeJets, la empresa de aviación ejecutiva de Globalia, formalizó el pedido de los once primeros aparatos de su flota a la compañía brasileña Embraer, por un importe de 63,6 millones de dólares. Esta contratación en firme viene acompañada, además, de la toma de posiciones sobre otras seis aeronaves de la misma factoría. El pedido de Globalia se desglosa en tres distintos modelos de avión, con diferentes capacidades operativas. Desde el más pequeño para hasta ocho pasajeros al Legacy 600, capaz de transportar a 16 personas a más de 6.000 kilómetros de distancia.


Fuente: Sur Digital


9/4/2007 5:47:00 PM | Aviación Corporativa

Antiguamente era un lujo, hoy es una necesidad. Y es que el tiempo cuesta dinero, en especial para aquellas empresas que requieren de rapidez y eficiencia en sus transacciones de negocios. Las aerolíneas regulares ya no se los pueden proveer. La aviación corporativa ha llenado ese espacio de mercado y cada día es más frecuente ver a altos ejecutivos moverse dentro del país, o de una nación a otra, en un solo día. Las grandes corporaciones no están para perder tiempo porque es lo mismo que perder dinero.

El hombre ha hecho negocios toda su vida, partiendo del trueque, que hoy es casi imposible de encontrar. Con el tiempo los hombre se fueron dando cuenta de que para negociar mejor debían moverse de territorio, así nace el transporte marítimo y el terrestre. Pero el paso de los años trajo consigo la solución más efectiva, el transporte aéreo. Las líneas aéreas se convirtieron en una gran alternativa para el ejecutivo moderno, que se mueve alrededor del mundo en reuniones y negocios, tanto desde el punto de vista económico como de rapidez. Pero los fatídicos hechos del 11 de septiembre en Estados Unidos cambiaron todo.

La seguridad, llevada en ocasiones a extremos, se convirtió en un problema para aquellos que requieren rapidez en sus viajes. Las enormes filas en el aeropuerto, las exhaustivas revisiones de equipaje, y en ocasiones la pérdida de éstos, han transformado los viajes de negocios en largas travesías.

Para poder viajar un ejecutivo debe tener disponible el día entero, aunque el tiempo de vuelo real sólo sea de dos horas. Con ello es un día menos de trabajo, y todos sabemos que en las empresas cada día cuenta.

Para ello nació hace muchos años la aviación corporativa, pero sus altos costos sólo permitían que algunos afortunados tuviesen acceso a ella. Sus precios eran muy elevados, tanto de mantenimiento como de funcionamiento, aunque el confort seguía siendo superior a cualquier tipo de transporte conocido.

¿Qué es la aviación corporativa?

Ésta comprende los vuelos realizados en aeronaves tripuladas por pilotos profesionales que son propiedad de empresas, para el transporte de su personal por razones de trabajo y para el transporte de sus bienes o productos. En todo caso, no hay nada superior a gozar de la calma y la tranquilidad que nos ofrece el poder tener un jet tan solo para nosotros. Sobre todo para aquellos que no tienen tiempo para perder en el aeropuerto, ya que la siguiente reunión espera y cada segundo cuenta, porque implica dinero, incluso nos otorga la posibilidad de realizar reuniones mientras realizamos el viaje.

Es por ello que hoy en día hay un boom en el mercado de los jets corporativos, pero no sólo en Estados Unidos, sino también en nuestro país. Para muchas empresas con visión de negocios y de productividad, es más importante el tener a sus más altos ejecutivos en donde es necesario tenerlos, que ahorrarse unos cuantos dólares o pesos, perdiendo tiempo muy valioso.

Dentro de este rubro se ha creado un nuevo concepto conocido como aviación corporativa compartida, modalidad que permite a una compañía o individuo asociarse con otros y comprar una fracción o acción en un avión ejecutivo. De esta manera una compañía independiente se encarga de vender las fracciones, operar y administrar el equipo. El costo de la fracción depende de la cantidad de propietarios. No se trata de un programa de tiempo compartido puesto que el accionista tiene acceso al servicio las 24 horas del día los 7 días de la semana, es decir, inclusive si alguno de los otros dueños está utilizando el equipo al mismo tiempo. Los mercados, incluido la aviación, se adaptan a los tiempos y presupuestos de las empresas, y brindan todo tipo de facilidades para que adquieran sus productos, tales como jets, piezas o el mantenimiento. Comprar un avión ya no es un derroche, es una necesidad.

Ésta comprende los vuelos realizados en aeronaves tripuladas por pilotos profesionales que son propiedad de empresas, para el transporte de su personal por razones de trabajo y para el transporte de sus bienes o productos. En todo caso, no hay nada superior a gozar de la calma y la tranquilidad que nos ofrece el poder tener un jet tan solo para nosotros. Sobre todo para aquellos que no tienen tiempo para perder en el aeropuerto, ya que la siguiente reunión espera y cada segundo cuenta, porque implica dinero, incluso nos otorga la posibilidad de realizar reuniones mientras realizamos el viaje.

Es por ello que hoy en día hay un boom en el mercado de los jets corporativos, pero no sólo en Estados Unidos, sino también en nuestro país. Para muchas empresas con visión de negocios y de productividad, es más importante el tener a sus más altos ejecutivos en donde es necesario tenerlos, que ahorrarse unos cuantos dólares o pesos, perdiendo tiempo muy valioso.

Dentro de este rubro se ha creado un nuevo concepto conocido como aviación corporativa compartida, modalidad que permite a una compañía o individuo asociarse con otros y comprar una fracción o acción en un avión ejecutivo. De esta manera una compañía independiente se encarga de vender las fracciones, operar y administrar el equipo. El costo de la fracción depende de la cantidad de propietarios.

No se trata de un programa de tiempo compartido puesto que el accionista tiene acceso al servicio las 24 horas del día los 7 días de la semana, es decir, inclusive si alguno de los otros dueños está utilizando el equipo al mismo tiempo. Los mercados, incluido la aviación, se adaptan a los tiempos y presupuestos de las empresas, y brindan todo tipo de facilidades para que adquieran sus productos, tales como jets, piezas o el mantenimiento. Comprar un avión ya no es un derroche, es una necesidad.



Fuente: Mercado-MediaNetwork


7/3/2007 10:40:03 AM | El dueño de La Bruixa d’Or anuncia que entra en el negocio aeronáutico.

Crea Numbair, que nace con una inversión de 19,3 millones de euros.


El empresario Xavier Gabriel, propietario de la administración de lotería de Sort La Bruixa d'Or, la que más vende en todo el Estado, ha anunciado hoy en una rueda de prensa en el hotel Majestic de Barcelona que entra en el negocio aeronáutico al haber creado la compañía Numbair, dedicada a la aviación privada de negocios.



Gabriel anunció que operará a partir de 2010 con cuatro birreactores Phenom 100 y uno del modelo 300 del fabricante brasileño Embraer. Numbair tendrá bases en Madrid, Barcelona y Baleares y, según declaró, la inversión inicial es de 19,3 millones de euros aportados por él y su familia. Posteriormente, cuando recepcione otros cinco jets más, se podrían añadir otros socios.



Xavier Gabriel, que entre sus asesores cuenta con el profesor del IESE José Luis Nueno, estuvo acompañado por Colin Steven, vicepresidente para Europa, África y Asia de Embraer. Steven manifestó que Embraer prevé obtener la certificación EASA para el Phenom 100 en el primer trimestre de 2009. Preguntado por Aerosabadell.com, dijo que dentro de tres meses se sabrá la distancia de carrera de despegue que necesitará el Phenom 100 para elevarse con el peso máximo al despegue. Entonces, sabremos si podrá realizar operaciones desde el Aeropuerto de Sabadell, cuya pista es de 900 metros.



Numbair elige Embraer



Numbair se convierte así en la primera empresa que tendrá los jets Phenom 100, encuadrado en la categoría Very Light Jet (VLJ). Su capacidad es para cuatro pasajeros más dos pilotos. El Phenom 300 puede llevar a seis o siete pasajeros, dependiendo de la configuración interna, más dos pilotos.



Xavier Gabriel, que vestía chaqueta sin corbata, manifestó que Numbair estará formado por un «equipo serio y profesional» que podrá llegar a superar las 30 personas. Explicó que los VLJ está llamados a «revolucionar» la aviación privada en Europa, al ser la modalidad del taxi aéreo la forma más rápida y cómoda de efectuar desplazamientos. Consideró que las perspectivas del mercado español son buenas, pues aunque hay pocos aeropuertos «se van a incrementar». Y mencionó los de Lleida y La Cerdanya, que ayudarán «a que se abra el mercado».



Pérfil del cliente



Preguntado por el perfil de los clientes de los vuelo que ofertará Numbair, dijo que principalmente serán del mundo de los ejecutivos, empresarios y hombres de negocios. Pero también, los de «nivel social medio», que, por ejemplo, podrán iniciar «su viaje de novios a París en jet privado» a un precio algo superior al de un pasaje de avión. Gabriel no concretó a como calcula que saldrá la hora de vuelo, pero el representante de Embraer afirmó que los costes operativos del Phenom 100 no superarán los 500 dólares por hora de vuelo. En una época en la que determinadas marcas asociadas al lujo ya no son exclusivas de los millonarios, habrá quien desee premiarse con un vuelo en un jet. Numbair aspira a transportar al año a más de 15.000 pasajeros y Gabriel dijo estar convencido de que su empresa tendrá el primer año 1,3 millones de euros de beneficio neto.



En otro momento de la rueda de prensa, el famoso lotero -que figura en la lista de espera para realizar un vuelo como turista espacial en 2008-, dijo que la inversión inicial es de 19,3 millones de euros, aportado por la familia Gabriel. Agregó que lleva dos años estudiando la inversión que va a realizar en el mundo aeronáutico y que algunos empresarios que estaban al tanto del proyecto le han pedido entrar como inversores. Esa posibilidad, dijo Gabriel, quedará abierta a partir de la ampliación de la flota de cinco a 10 birreactores.



Colin Steven dijo de pasada que pronto va a comenzar el proceso de certificación del Phenom 100. El fabricante espera lograrla en un año, pues se anunció mediante diapositivas que Embraer prevé entregar en 2008 entre 15 y 20 aparatos. Para el primer trimestre de 2009 se obtendrá la certificación EASA, lo cual comportará su matriculación en países europeos. Embraer aspira acabar ese año con entre 120 y 150 entregas totales de los dos modelos de aparatos.



Argumento de venta no desvelado



Steven dijo que dentro de tres meses Embraer anunciará la longitud de pista que necesita recorrer el Phenom 100 para despegar. En el inicipiente segmento de los VLJ ese dato lo proporcionan los fabricantes como un argumento de venta, pues a menos metros aumentan el número de aeropuertos y aeródromos en los que puede operar, incrementando las posibilidades de dejar al cliente lo más rápido y los más cerca posible de su destino.



Según el portavoz de Embraer, la cartera de pedidos asciende a 460 aparatos, procedentes de 35 países. El diseño interior de los jets lleva la firma de Designworks BMW de Estados Unidos. Subrayó que por ahora son los únicos jets que sólo tienen un punto para el repostaje y que la limpieza del lavabo se efectuará desde fuera del exterior del aparato.



Tras la rueda de prensa, Xavier Gabriel y Colin Steven se estrecharon las manos antes los fotógrafos, portando en la otra cada uno una maqueta de los Phenom.


1/2/2007 5:07:00 PM | Flying Like a CEO

Something happened last week in Albuquerque, NM, that may soon affect every business traveler. It was a relatively modest event involving a relatively small jet that may well herald a major revolution in air travel.

The Eclipse 500, the very first of a new category of airplane called Very Light Jets (jets under 10,000 pounds gross weight, with only six seats), won provisional certification from the Federal Aviation Administration. Translation: this FAA approval could eventually free the beleaguered, non-Gulfstream-owning road warrior from the gulag of commercial air travel!

OK, that may be a bit overstated, but what the dawn of the VLJ (very light jet) is scheduled to usher in is the beginning of nationwide aerial jet taxi services provided by several companies whose aircraft will be able to swoop in on-demand to a local airport, pick you up, and fly you directly to another local airport of your choosing. By "local airports," by the way, I mean those easy-to-use small fields where you can actually find parking and board your flight within minutes of arriving. (There are thousands around the country.) In other words, an economical and routine way of avoiding major hub airports such as New York's JFK, Chicago's O'Hare, and Atlanta's Hartsfield (as in: "I don't know where I'm going to go when I die, but I do know I'll connect through Atlanta!")

Think about it. No changing planes in enormous terminals.

No two hour-before-departure arrivals at the airport.

And no lost or delayed bags.

The cost of this service? Well, that's the best part: It is expected to be about around the price of a fully refundable coach airline ticket (roughly $1.70 per seat per mile) — a fraction of what it costs to charter a private jet.

What makes VLJs possible are a new generation of very small but ultra-powerful turbofan jet engines (the Eclipse 500's engines, for instance, weigh around 250 pounds but produce 900 pounds of thrust), and the advanced use of lightweight, non-metallic carbon-fiber materials. The new Eclipse is pressurized, able to fly at more than 365 knots, and features a state-of-the-art computerized cockpit with the same all-weather capabilities a Boeing has. It will be able to fly over a thousand miles without refueling, and carry up to five passengers and a pilot with safety levels expected to equal those of the major airlines.

If you happen to be the CEO of a company sufficiently successful to own or lease a business aircraft, you already understand the immense benefits a private jet holds over commercial travel, none more pronounced than time saved. The difference between VLJs and corporate jets, however, is money, and only money — a VLJ can do the same point-to-point job as a Gulfstream, but at one-sixth the expense!

Frankly, airline travel, especially on shorter business trips to smaller communities, is a stressful, inefficient, bloody agony. That's what VLJs can help avoid. As I've detailed before in this column, the only way to truly survive a regular exposure to this system is to realize that you must jump over the commercial airline and TSA hurdles to ride, or be penalized by missed flights, extra nights without a paid hotel, lost bags, and massive increases in stress.

But even if airline travel wasn't so stressful, short airline trips are still startlingly wasteful in terms of the time it takes to just get there and back. Imagine trying to explain the basics of today's short-trip travel choices to the average math class (insert the sounds of chalk on a blackboard at will).

"Okay class, assume we're going to Hagerstown, Md., from New York City, on a business trip. Hagerstown is 250 road miles away, 190 air miles. If you're in a jet that flies 550 miles per hour, how long will the trip take?"

"Ah, twenty-three minutes?"

"No. Three hours and 10 minutes from start to finish. First you fly to Pittsburgh after waiting a half hour on the taxiway, and then you can fly on to Hagerstown. Total time from first departure at La Guardia to your arrival in Hagerstown, three hours 10 minutes. But total time from your door in New York to your hotel in Delaware? Five hours, 40 minutes"

"What? But Teach! That doesn't make sense!"

"Tell me about it! But you need at least 45 minutes get to the airport, and you need to be there at least an hour and a half before flight time. The flight time is three hours and 10 minutes, expect 30 minutes to get your bags and get a cab into downtown Hagerstown, and it adds up to 5:40. If you drove it in a car at a 60 mile per hour average, you'd take only four hours and 40 minutes for the same trip."


The problem is much the same across America: While non-stop airline service across the country between major cities is plentiful (if hopelessly crowded), flying to or from smaller communities has become a longer, tougher, and far more challenging choice, usually involving at least one stop and change of planes. There are thousands of municipal airports in the U.S. with runways long enough for VLJs (3,415 to be exact), and only 443 of them now have commercial airline service. Imagine the convenience of being able to use all of those 3,415 airports, and essentially flying to within 30 miles of nearly 94 percent of the places a business traveler wants to go.

In the Hagerstown example, for instance, allow 45 minutes to reach the airport from downtown New York, and perhaps 20 minutes to board your specially-arranged VLJ taxi flight. The point-to-point flight to Hagerstown over approximately 190 miles will take roughly 50 minutes, allowing for slower approach and departure speeds, and since there's no chance of lost bags, getting a car or cab to downtown will take about 10 minutes. Here's the eye-watering comparison:

Head To Head: Air Travel
  VLJ Service Commercial Airline
Downtown NYC to Airport   45 minutes   45 minutes
Flight Boarding Time   20 minutes   1 hour and 30 minutes
Time in Transit - Departure to Destination   50 minutes   3 hours and 10 minutes
Destination Airport to Downtown   10 minutes   30 minutes
Total Time Door-to-Door   2 hours and 5 minutes   5 hours and 55 minutes
Cost   $850   $863 (fully refundable as of 7/1/2006)


Add to the cost of driving, however, at least one, if not two, hotel nights, which (at $125 each) equals $466. That's still a bit more than half of the cost of flying, but the wear and tear and dangers of being on the highway also need to be factored in, along with additional food for additional time away. The singular outstanding advantage of driving is that, with the exception of massive traffic snarls, you're in control.

Also, I should point out that the minimal $863 price is a fully refundable coach ticket. Advance purchase non-refundable tickets for that same New York-to-Hagerstown roundtrip can be had for around $310, but as most of us in the market for business transportation understand, the airlines work tirelessly to prevent the business traveler from using the low-cost tickets and trips which pop up within a week seldom get such low fares.

As is obvious from the comparisons, when VLJ taxis enter the market and the service matures to the level of nationwide reliability (think Fedex), the only real competition for the in terms of cost will be the automobile. In terms of time, they will trump all other methods with the exception of the CEO's Learjet.

Fuente/Source: http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/BusinessTravel/story?id=2269182&page=1




Industrias Centro S.R.L.
Tucumán 513 - Piso 9
Buenos Aires - Argentina - (1049)
54 11 4894 0250 | 54 9 11 (15) 3227-4000 | 54 9 11 (15) 6646-1160

Facebook
Copyright 2006 - 2015 Industrias Centro S.R.L. Todos los derechos reservados


Administrador de Aeronaves - Powered by Jofmedia.com